Listen up: Skipping meals will not make you lose weight faster. If a hectic day makes a sit-down meal impossible, stash an energy bar or a piece of fruit in your car or tote, keep snacks in your office desk drawer, and make a point of getting up to grab a nosh — anything that will keep you from going hungry! Going long periods of time without food does double-duty harm on our healthy eating efforts by both slowing down your metabolism, and priming you for another binge later in the day. (Think: You've skipped breakfast and lunch, so you're ready to takedown a whole turkey by dinner!) Make it your mission to eat three meals and two snacks every day, and don't wait longer than three to four hours without eating. Set a "snack alarm" on your phone if needed.


If you’re on a quest to jumpstart weight loss, why not kick your metabolism into overdrive by sneaking spicy foods into your diet. Capsaicin, the active ingredient in cayenne pepper that gives it its spiciness, revs up your metabolism in a way that’s conducive to weight loss. In fact, according to a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, those who supplemented their diet with capsaicin consumed 200 fewer calories during their next meal.
The next time you're craving some crunch, drop the potato chips and grab some celery instead. The veggie is essentially all water and fiber — two things that fill you up quickly. And while one cup of chips can be upward of 160 cals, celery only contains about 6 calories per stalk. Dip them in a serving of peanut butter or hummus for a healthy snack.
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He is, however, quick to point out that nobody is doing this with any harmful intentions. But he does stress that erroneous information has a tendency to be elevated into truths if it’s repeated sufficiently often. And when myths like these are as widespread as they are, they prevent the public and professionals from getting their priorities right in the fight against obesity.

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