About this course: This 5 week course will guide learners through the essential steps in planning an individualized weight loss program. There is no guarantee of weight loss through completing the course; learners will have the framework and essential components for an evidence-based weight loss program. This course is intended for healthy adults who do not have any chronic disease such as diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, lung disease or any others. In addition, this course does not provide information for people who have food allergies or intolerances. Losing weight and keeping it off requires planning and goal-setting. Crash diets or fad diets are ineffective and can be dangerous. This course provides evidence-based information for planning a weight loss program that is safe and effective in producing a one to two pound loss per week. This course will help learners establish the following: 1. A realistic goal weight with a specific plan for rate of weight loss and time frame for achieving goal weight. 2. A realistic goal for the frequency, duration, and intensity of exercise that will enable the learner to achieve and maintain the goal weight. 3. A specific set of strategies for grocery shopping, eating in restaurants, eating at social occasions, and dealing with hunger and emotional eating. 4. A plan for monitoring food intake, exercise and weight loss. 5. A plan for continued evaluation of progress to goals and strategies for adjusting goals for continued weight loss for the next 6 months or longer. 6. A thorough understanding of the difficulty of maintaining weight loss and a plan for maximizing the chances of keeping off the weight lost. 

The results suggest that WL could improve anthropometric status and lipid and glycemic profiles regardless of calorie restriction and the speed of WL. However, there could be some differences between the 2 protocol types of WL in terms of impact. The WL regardless of its severity could improve anthropometric indicators, although body composition is more favorable following a slow WL. Both diets improved lipid and glycemic profiles. In this context, rapid WL was more effective. 

Harder et al. reported that rapid WL could significantly decrease weight, triglycerides, total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, fasting blood glucose (FBS), hemoglobin A1c, and fasting serum insulin (FINS) (16). Also, Wahlroos et al. reported that a significant decrease in waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), subcutaneous abdominal fat volume, and insulin resistance occurred after rapid WL (17).
I just read your piece on weight loss rated rapid vs slow and steady. I am a veteran with decades of experience. I have successfully lost 143 pounds in 2001 with what is known as the vlcd program. I spent from March 31,2001 until November of 2001 with 700 calories average daily intake. I came out at a healthy weight but not mentally prepared to deal with the aftermath of a completely morphed body image. I could not wrap my brain around what had transpired in 6 short months. I still saw the 333 pound woman when I looked in the mirror. I still caught myself looking in the plus sized clothing section. There are as many factors that cause morbid obesity as there are programs offering the “cure”
Because each cup contains almost no calories, green tea can boost your metabolism and improve your body’s efficiency for burning energy. Research has suggested that the flavonoids it contains are responsible for increasing fat oxidation levels and improving insulin activity in your body. Some studies show that substituting tea for calorie-filled drinks can lead to about a pound of weight loss a week.
If you’re dropping weight quickly in an unhealthy manner, you may be putting yourself at risk of malnutrition, a condition in which you’re not eating enough calories or micronutrients (e.g. vitamins and minerals) — or both. If your diet isn’t balanced with the proper amounts of carbs, protein, and healthy fats, you’re probably not eating enough of the nutrients your body needs to thrive.
Your favorite childhood snack is good for your grown-up self, too. Because peanut butter is a great source of protein and healthy fats, it can curb hunger and keep you feeling full long after you're finished eating. Having small snacks during the day that include a lean protein such as peanut butter with complex carbs (like an apple or banana) can also help keep your metabolism running smoothly.
As funny as it sounds, sleep deprivation may make you fat — and not just because you're susceptible to cases of the late-night munchies (although there's that too). There's tons of research that demonstrates getting less than the desired amount — about 7 hours — of sleep per night can slow down your metabolism. Plus, when you're awake for longer, you're naturally more likely to nosh. So don't skimp on your ZZZs, and you'll be rewarded with an extra edge when it comes to shedding pounds quickly.
Sesame seeds likely aren’t one of those foods you pay any mind to, but the crunchy little buggers have been shown to play a crucial role in weight maintenance and deserve to be tossed into a salad or whole wheat noodle dish. Researchers suspect its the lignans—plant compounds—found in sesame seeds (and flax seeds) that makes them so special. In a 2015 study, women who consumed high levels of lignans tended to weigh less and gain less weight over time when compared to women who didn’t consume these compounds in high amounts.
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